When your game is at burn-time....

Forum: 

A question of interest to garage-programmers

Say you've written your first game[8D], perhaps as part
of a small group of friends or solo.. How would
you go about protecting it under Australian law
(copyrighting)? An archaic method I've heard is
to post a copy of the game to yourself and have
it held, unopened in a bank...

Blitz's picture

Your work is automatically protected under australian copyright law (by virtue that you are the one who created it), what you're talking about though is proving your claim?
You can do this by sending yourself a *registered* mail, and the postage data/stamp will serve as plentiful proof of the date. Of course you need to keep the letter closed. It doesn't need to be held in a bank, that would just be so you don't lose it :P
CYer, Blitz

WiffleCube's picture

That's useful to know, thanks. It might encourage a few enthusiasts to break the mold and publish without being worried about the legal paperwork.

Daemin's picture

Just remember that publishers will always have more money than you, and thus more money equals better lawyers and more of them.

So still take caution and get your own legal advice.

McKnight's picture

What happens if there is a bank robbery? :D You never know some random Game Designers might get low on ideas and decide to rob banks to see if it contains any game plots. Think about it...

Well anyway, I believe you should cover yourself with several methods. Like send it to yourself and also hold it in a bank and if you have the money get the legal advice.

redwyre's picture

I wouldn't be so worried.. personally I'd release a demo of the game to some "official" sites (sites that people know and trust) so that everyone knows that you made it :)

If you are really worried, you should talk to a lawyer that does this stuff.